February 28, 2015

FDA Proposals Take a Fresh Look at Some Stale Food Issues

Tamar June

Tamar June, VP, Strategic Marketing, AssurX, Inc.

That landmark Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) just keeps getting more and more important. Earlier this month, the FDA unveiled four proposed amendments that will likely make a tough law even tougher.

FSMA, signed into law in January 2011, is designed to tighten food safety regulations and shift the focus to a proactive mindset and away from FDA’s relatively reactive approach in years past. FDA has now proposed seven rules to implement FSMA. This new wave of proposed revisions target four areas: produce-safety; preventive controls for human food; preventive controls for animal food; and the foreign supplier verification program.

The action follows FDA’s May announcement it was engaging in the rule-making and guidance development process required to establish the new prevention-oriented standards. FDA implementation teams have developed a slew of ideas for how the agency can better oversee the food industry, strengthen the global food safety system, and enhance protection of public health. Planning has also begun for the next phase of FSMA implementation, which involves advancing new public health prevention standards and implementing the strategic and risk-based industry oversight framework at the heart of FSMA.

In just part of what could go into effect next year, FDA calls for revisions to the foreign-supplier verification proposed rule. It aims to give importers more flexibility to determine appropriate supplier verification measures based on risk and previous experience with their suppliers.

Arguably, one of the more important FDA proposals is a new call to develop current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) more applicable to the animal food industry, provide flexibility for a wider diversity in the types of animal food facilities, and establish standards for producing safe animal food.

foodsafety570However, human food processors already complying with FDA human food safety requirements, such as brewers, would not need to implement additional preventive controls or cGMP regulations when supplying a by-product (e.g., wet spent grains, fruit or vegetable peels, liquid whey) for animal food, except for proposed cGMPs to prevent physical and chemical contamination when holding and distributing the by-product (e.g., ensuring the by-product isn’t co-mingled with garbage). That noted, further processing a by-product for use as animal food (e.g., drying, pelleting, heat treatment) would still require compliance with the preventive controls for animal food rule.

FDA’s new amendments would also make exemptions a bit clearer, and raise the requirements defining a “very small business.” To be considered tiny, a firm must post less than $2.5 million in total annual sales of animal food, adjusted for inflation. FDA expects that exemption to apply to just over 4,000 facilities.

The proposed rules also address some supplier issues. FDA wants new controls addressing those occasions when the receiving facility’s hazard analysis identifies a significant hazard for a raw material or ingredient, and that hazard is controlled before the facility receives the raw material or ingredient from a supplier.

If these new FDA proposals become the law of the land, the facility would have flexibility to determine the appropriate verification activity (such as onsite audit, sampling and testing, review of supplier’s records) unless there is reasonable probability that exposure to the hazard will result in serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals.

Industry and any other interested parties have some time to weigh in on the FDA’s proposals. The FDA will accept comments on the proposed revisions of the four proposed rules for 75 days starting next week (September 29) while continuing to review comments already received on the sections of the proposed rules that are going to change. The agency will consider all comments before issuing final rules sometime next year.

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FDA Guidance Advises Device Makers to Think About Home-Use

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

Medical device manufacturers would be well-advised to address any potential home-use products risk at the design state, says an August guidance from the FDA.

As the agency notes, “Failure to adequately consider potentially hazardous situations during the design of home use devices may result in inappropriate use, use error, or incompatibilities between the use environment, the user, and the device. This could cause the device to malfunction, possibly contributing to death or serious injury.”

It could also make the FDA really angry.

The guidance offers advice designed to address then entire manufacturing process — and beyond. It covers environmental issues, user issues, design issues, human factors, labeling challenges, postmarket considerations, and the always fun human factor

Digging a little deeper into the guidance, FDA covers many layers of these topics, including:

  • Environmental considers such as location, contaminants, water supply, temperature, dampness and humidity, atmospheric pressure changes, air flow, travel and international use, fluid exposure and storage.
  • User considerations such as physical location, sensor/perception requirements, plus cognitive and emotional product demand.
  • Design issues, including lock-out mechanisms, maintenance and calibration, mechanical issues and special emphasis of electrical issues. As noted earlier, this is probably the section deserving the closest examination by medical device makers.
  • Human factors ranging from user training to certifications.
  • Labeling issues including describing the basic handling of the device, how to dispose of it in an emergency, disposal, and hygienic maintenance.
  • Post-market considerations such as robust customer service and medical device reporting.

electronic document managementFDA’s Medical Device Reporting (MDR) regulation requires manufacturers to submit reports to the FDA whenever it becomes aware of information that reasonably suggests that a device it sells may have caused or contributed to a reportable death or serious injury, or has malfunctioned and the malfunction would be likely to cause or contribute to a reportable death or serious injury should it recur.

For the FDA Form 3500A, instructions for completing specific items on the form, and the coding manual see MedWatch: The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program.

For additional guidance on the MDR regulation and the reporting requirements refer to FDA’s guidance Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers (March, 1997). FDA advises medical device manufacturers to also take a look at its draft guidance Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers (July 9, 2013).

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FDA Spreads Regulatory Love Nationwide

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

Detroit may be struggling with bankruptcy, but in a flurry of activity that would make industrialist Henry Ford proud, the local FDA office has been active in our latest warning letter round-up.

Indiana-based Med-Mizer, manufacturer of AC powered, adjustable and bariatric hospital beds, was hit by FDA’s Detroit office with a 12-point letter dated July 21.

Among FDA’s accusations, Med-Miser failed to:

  • Establish procedures for reviewing and evaluating incoming complaints
  • Develop, conduct and control and monitor its production process
  • Establish and maintain design controls
  • Validate a manufacturing process
  • Ensure its products meet acceptance criteria

Ventilab LLC, a manufacturer of manual resuscitation bags based in Grand Rapids, was also dinged by the Detroit office for CAPA shortcomings, inadequate complaint management, and failing to establish an acceptable risk management plan.

warning640Moving east to the City of Brotherly Love, FDA’s Philadelphia District office sent a warning letter to the maker of a sleep apnea monitor citing it for failure to ensure its device conformed to specifications and requirements. That June 30 letter was the result of a series of April 2014 inspections.

A June 27 letter called out Zynex Medical, manufacturer of the NexWave multiple mode electrical stimulator and the IF8000 electrical stimulator for perceived CAPA and design control and verification shortcomings. Zynex, baed in Lone Tree, Colorado, was also hit for failure to have adequate device master records and internal audit procedures.

Out in Napa, California where the weather is lovely and the wine flows, June 25 was probably not a day to celebrate for Dexta Corporation, manufacturer of medical chairs used for Lasik surgery and other procedures. FDA hit them for, among other things, failure to adequately train personnel, inability to verify test results, CAPA issues, and process controls problems.

Henry Ford, a man who tried to build his own utopian city in the jungles of the Amazon and modestly name it Fordlandia, would be proud of the FDA’s devotion to hard work these past few months. Perhaps there is an FDAlandia on some city planners drawing board just waiting for the green light. You never know.

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FDA Lets MDDS Off The Regulatory Hook

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

FDA won’t enforce compliance with regulatory controls that apply to medical image storage devices (MDDS) and medical image communications devices recognizing the “low risk” they pose to patient safety and the importance they play in advancing digital health.

The good news came in a guidance released June 20, “Medical Device Data Systems, Medical Image Storage Devices, and Medical Image Communications Devices.”

Specifically off the hook are MDDS’ subject to 21 CFR 880.6310, medical image storage devices subject to 21 CFR 892.2010, and medical image communications devices subject to 21 CFR 892.2020. Devices in these categories won’t be subject to FDA regulatory enforcement regarding registration and listing, premarket review, postmarket reporting and quality system regulations.

As defined by the FDA, MDDS is a medical device intended to store and/or move edata without controlling or altering the functions or parameters of any connected medical device.

 

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Medical Device Warning Letter Round-Up: FDA Won’t Take No For an Answer

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

Michael Causey, Editor & Publisher, eDataIntegrityReport.com

This latest round of warning letters is all about pushback.

The FDA is not happy with the responses it received from Acme Monaco Corp., a New Britain, Connecticut-based manufacturer of medical guardwires for cardiovascular and urologic use.

In an April 28 letter, the agency reminds the company that an earlier FDA inspection revealed that these devices are adulterated within the meaning of section 501(h) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. § 351(h), in that the methods used in, or the facilities or controls used for, their manufacture, packing, storage, or installation are not in conformity with the current good manufacturing practice requirements of the Quality System regulation found at Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 820.

Mar Cor Purification in Minnesota was hit with an April 17 letter that found fault with, among other things, its CAPA, complaint handling, and document control. In addition, the FDA said Mar Cor’s March responses were inadequate. Mar Cor manufactures water purificaiton systems used to diagnose diseases.

FDAlogoHeading over to Wisconsin, a March FDA letter hit Cytophill Inc, a manufacturer or synthetic bone graft material, bone void fillers, and an intranasal splint, for a number of shortcomings.

In addition to hitting the firm for below mark CAPA, process and storage controls, FDA warned it about failure to:

  • Control environmental conditions
  • Validate a process whose results cannot be verified by subsequent inspection and test
  • Establish procedures to handle changes to a specification.

As many former FDA inspectors have told us over the years, a bad response to a warning letter is a really bad idea. Most FDA inspectors will work with you if they believe you are acting in good faith to correct the problem. It’s not unlike the IRS. If you call them and work out a lenient, reasonable payment plan, everything’s fine. Unless you miss a payment or two without giving them a heads-up. That’s when the trouble usually begins.

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The Six C’s of Document Management Best Practices for Life Sciences

Jeff Mazik, Vice President, Life Science Solutions, AssurX

Jeff Mazik, Vice President, Life Science Solutions, AssurX

Implementing a best practice solution for any quality process is essential to help an emerging Life Science company insure compliance and quality for their organization.  Especially when it comes to Document Management, regulatory agencies in the Life Science industries expect that your company has proper controls in place that insure the documents you are using have been properly authored, reviewed and approved and that your staff have been adequately trained on them and, of course, can easily access and use the effective documents at all times.  As documents are truly the backbone of all of your quality processes, this is indeed appropriate.  For if your documents are not controlled, neither will be your processes.

Utilizing an electronic Document Management System is the first step.  A workflow and task-based electronic system can provide you with a central repository for all documents and gives you the potential to implement an infrastructure that allows for much more control and interoperability than if you try to manage documents manually or on a server file share.  Some advantages of using a workflow based process include activity reminders for those tasked to do work, automated activities and notifications, virtual collaborations, metrics tracking, and providing overall increased control and visibility.

electronic document managementMany start-ups and emerging companies in the Life Science industries are constrained in a number of ways, particularly in funds and resources.  This can present many hurdles in trying to get a useful Document Management System in place.  In order to minimize costs and expending copious resources, some options to consider include: selecting a solution that can effectively address multiple business or quality needs to increase ROI, a solution that provides a lower cost option of hosting off-site (e.g. Cloud based solution), one that utilizes non-proprietary infrastructures, and one that can be configured without requiring programming resources.

A best practice approach for implementing an electronic Document Management system can be summed up into “Six C’s”.  These six terms help identify the areas that should be addressed when implementing an electronic Document Management system.  The Six C’s are:

Consistency:  Use the system as a central repository for all documents, implementing consistent workflow path(s) for documents depending on document type.  Use consistent Document Templates and standardize attributes (e.g. approvers, periodic review timelines) for similar document types.

Communication: Information must be easily available to your staff throughout the
workflow process, allowing virtual collaboration no matter where the team is located.  Furthermore, those people in this document review/approval process that are assigned tasks must be provided communication and follow-up reminders to insure their tasks are being completed on-time and never “fall through the cracks”.  Finally, notifications of new and revised documents must be communicated effectively to the training organization to insure requirement employee training is accomplished.

Client experience: The electronic system should incorporate end-user functionality that increases performance and acceptance such as: including built-in instructions within the process itself as well as visual hints or cues that make it obvious to the user where the document is in the process and what to do next.  Also, provide varied search functionalities and options that allow users to easily find documents they need.  Plus, automate as many activities as possible, especially those that can be easily forgotten by a user, causing re-work.  

Control: As with any validated system, changes to the process need to be controlled and managed under change control procedures.  Control of the “original” electronic document files themselves is also an important concept.  Insuring there is no back-door to access/change documents at a file server level or shared folder perspective is very important.

Compliance: The electronic system must meet all applicable regulatory requirements (e.g. 21 CFR Part 11).  Also, implementing reminders and escalations when tasks are due (or late!) helps you to stay in compliance to objectives and agreed upon timelines.  Furthermore, by implementing an effective integration with a training management system allows you to stay compliant with employee training requirements.

Configurability: The solution you use should be easily configured, maintained, and updated, breaking you from a strong reliance on costly programmers, consultants, and specialized IT resources to make a change or to add a step to the process.

If you are interested in getting more detailed information on the Six C’s of Document Management Best Practices please request to view our recent 60-minute “Life Science Best Practices for Document Management” Webinar here.

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Partnership of Productivity Tools Will Allow You to Focus More on Creating Quality Products

Dennis Payton, Vice President of Product Marketing and Development, Expandable Software, Inc.

Dennis Payton, Vice President of Product Marketing and Development, Expandable Software, Inc.

In 1908, the first Model T was created and more than 15 million were sold through mid-1927, proving that a focus on your core product can create a tidal wave of success. The plan and processes Henry Ford put in place to create the Model T, revolutionized the automotive industry. Having a streamlined set of processes is still important for manufacturing a quality product today. The Model T not only tells the story of efficiency and mass production, it also depicts the story of quality proving that they are not mutually exclusive.

The medical device industry is no doubt tough to do business in, whether it’s the constant threat from multiple competitors or the constant scrutiny from the FDA with 21 CFR Part 820 and Part 11, it’s an eat or get eaten world. Non-compliance with the FDA can result in a number of costly consequences including audits, recalls, production stoppage, substantial fines and potential lawsuits.

With the advancements of technology we are now able to efficiently control and monitor the process with tools such as an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system combined with a Quality Management System (QMS). Having the right partnership between your ERP and QMS vendors allows you to create a reliable support system.

erp/qmsimage

With such a support system in place your company can in turn focus more on your initial quality system, developing a sound and innovative product. The theory being that creating a quality product begins with the inception of the product. A house built on sand, no matter how nice it looks, is not going to work, and the same goes for a medical device, a quality product should be the goal from the very beginning. With today’s tools Henry Ford could create the ultimate formula: efficiency + variety + quality = success

A more detailed paper, Effective Compliance Programs Demand Sound Strategy, Strong Partners written by Michael Causey, outlines some of the key advantages your company stands to gain by selecting and ERP system that is integrated with your QMS. The never-ending challenge of creating and monitoring a quality system can contribute to your company’s increased regulatory compliance and customer satisfaction.

Get the full detailed White Paper here

About the Authors

Dennis Payton is Vice President of product marketing and development with Expandable Software Inc. He has 23 years of engineering, product management and executive management experience. He holds a BS in electrical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Louis Obispo, and post studies at Stanford University, University of California, Santa Cruz, and UC Berkley Haas School of Business.

Ryan Hussey is a marketing professional with Expandable Software, Inc. Mr. Hussey holds a BS of Business Marketing from San Jose State University and contributes personal time to coaching youth swimming classes and teams at local South Bay Area swim clubs.

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The Six C’s of Complaints Management Best Practices for Life Sciences

Jeff Mazik, Vice President, Life Science Solutions, AssurX

Jeff Mazik, Vice President, Life Science Solutions, AssurX

Companies in the Pharmaceutical, Medical Device, and Biotech industries must meet many regulatory requirements for a number of regulatory agencies. Chief among these are requirements from the FDA, as well as from ISO, plus they must meet expectations from a number of other regulatory agencies, depending on the particular market. Implementing best practice solutions for a company’s quality processes is essential to insure compliance and quality for the organization.

When it comes to Complaints Management, a best practice approach can be summed up into the Six C’s of Complaints Management. These six terms help identify the areas that need to be addressed when initiating a best practice complaints management system.

The Six C’s are:

Collection: Collect as much information at intake of the complaint as possible. This is a major customer “touch point” in the complaints resolution process, so don’t waste it. Furthermore, the collection of incoming complaints must be reviewed to determine if the communication is truly a complaint. Depending on the determination of that review, handle the situation accordingly.

complaintConsistency: Incoming complaints must be recorded with consistency in the information collected. To help facilitate this, questions to ask the customer must be designed to be consistent across similar events, allowing for accurate trending of product problems. Also, steps taken downstream in resolving the complaints process should be guided by providing consistent information to all people in the complaint resolution process.

Communication: Information collected during intake and throughout the process must be easily available to everyone in the complaint resolution process. Furthermore, those people in the complaints resolution process that are assigned tasks must be provided communication and reminders to insure their tasks are being completed on-time and never “fall through the cracks”. From a customer satisfaction perspective, the customer reporting the event must be informed of the status of the complaint using form letters or via online queries using a web portal.

Compliance: The electronic system must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. Furthermore, a consistent approach must be used to determine how soon complaints should be reported to the applicable regulatory agency.

Control: As with any validated system, changes to the process need to be controlled and managed under change control procedures. However, controlling one’s business in terms of allocating available resources, trending historical complaint attributes, and proper management of returned products is also essential for the business to succeed.

Configurability: The solution you use should be easily configured, maintained, and updated, breaking you from a strong reliance on costly programmers, consultants, and specialized IT resources to make a change or to add a step to the process.

If you are interested in getting more detailed information on the Six C’s of Complaints Management Best Practices please request to view our recent 60-minute “Life Science Best Practices for Handling Complaints” Webinar here.

 

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CDRH 2014 Strategic Priorities Promise Improved IDE, PMA Regulatory Climate

Tamar June

Tamar June, VP, Strategic Marketing, AssurX, Inc.

The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) will focus on encouraging medical device innovation and speeding clinical trials in the coming years, according to its 2014-2015 Strategic Priorities report released Feb. 5.

To help encourage that innovation, CDRH says it’s going to work to improve the consistency of the Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) process, especially in the areas of consistency and speed with which it handles applications. CDRH also pledges to find ways to encourage more early IDE studies — especially for those with medical devices aimed at the U.S. patient marketplace.

The report also says CDRH will try to find a better balance between premarket and postmarket data requirements.

CDRH sets measurable metric goals for improving IDE cycles:

  • By September 30, 2014, reduce the number of IDEs requiring more than two cycles to an appropriate full approval decision by 25 percent compared to FY 2013 performance.
  • By September 30, 2014, for disapproved IDEs, offer all sponsors a teleconference or in-person meeting to occur within 10 business days of the IDE decision.
  • By June 30, 2015, reduce the number of IDEs requiring more than two cycles to an appropriate full approval decision by 50 percent compared to FY 2013 performance.

Time to IDE Approval:

  • By September 30, 2014, reduce the overall median time to appropriate full IDE approval by 25 percent compared to FY 2013 performance.
  • By June 30, 2015, reduce the overall median time to full appropriate IDE approval to 30 days.
  • In FY 2013 (as of 12/11/2013), 45% of IDEs received a full approval decision within 2 cycles and median time to full IDE approval was 174 days.

2014 ClockBy June 30, 2015, the report says CDRH intends to increase the number of early feasibility/first-in-human IDE studies submitted to each premarket division compared to FY 2013 performance. CDRH promises several action steps here, including:

  • Establish in the Office of Device Evaluation a premarket clinical trials program responsible for the oversight and performance of the IDE Program and the development and implementation of policies that contribute to the timely initiation and successful execution of medical device clinical trials.
  • Formalize the incorporation of our benefit-risk framework, including patient-specific factors such as tolerance for risk and perspective on benefit, into the IDE process.
  • Establish a process to efficiently and objectively resolve application-specific IDE issues to reduce the number of multi-cycle IDEs.
  • Develop a clinical trials education and training program for CDRH review staff, managers, and industry.
  • Develop real-time metrics to track CDRH and industry IDE and clinical trial performance.

Turning to premarket and postmarket data requirements, the CDRH call to arms lays down more goals:

  • By December 31, 2014, review 50 percent of device types subject to a PMA that have been on the market to determine whether or not to shift some premarket data requirements to the postmarket setting or to pursue down classification, and communicate those decisions to the public.
  • By June 30, 2015, review 75 percent of device types subject to a PMA that have been on the market to determine whether or not to shift some premarket data requirements to the postmarket setting or to pursue down classification, and communicate those decisions to the public.
  • By December 31, 2015, review 100 percent of device types subject to a PMA that have been on the market to determine whether or not to shift some premarket data requirements to the postmarket setting or to pursue down classification, and communicate those decisions to the public.

CDRH plans several specific actions to help attain those targets, including:

  • Develop and seek public comment on a framework for when it is appropriate to shift premarket data collection to the postmarket setting.
  • Conduct a retrospective review of all PMA device types to determine whether or not to shift some premarket data requirements to the postmarket setting or to down classify device types in light of our current understanding of the technology.
  • Implement a mechanism to prospectively assure the appropriate balance of premarket and postmarket data requirements for new devices subject to a PMA.
  • Using existing authorities, develop and seek public comment on a new pathway to market for devices subject to a PMA that address an unmet public health need by shifting appropriate premarket data needs to the postmarket setting and incorporating features of the Innovation Pathway pilots.

The medical device industry no doubt applauds the majority of these goals. Now it’s time for CDRH to roll up its sleeves and get them done.

 

 

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Interpreting the FDA View of Medical Device Design Controls

Dennis Payton, Vice President of Product Marketing and Development, Expandable Software, Inc.

Dennis Payton, Vice President of Product Marketing and Development, Expandable Software, Inc.

Some of the shortest descriptions in the FDA CFR 21 Part 820 Quality System regulation are found in Sec. 820.30 and Sec. 820.40 totaling about a page of written language around Design Controls and Document Controls. However short, these two sections can be the most complex aspects of Medical Device controls when actual complying with the regulation. Fortunately, the FDA does give a bit more background to help a new medical device company understand these two key elements (see Medical Device Quality Systems Manual, A Small Entity Compliance Guide) but again with the detailed complexities, even those few pages of guidance (covered in section 9 Document and Change Control) fall short of coverage needed to understand the impact a company’s Medical Device Quality System. The good news is that there are some very good tools that can help mitigate these complexities and streamline controls. The bad news is that it still takes a very strong detailed and sustained effort to insure these complex controls are in place for continued success and compliance with regulation.

With a wide variety of Medical Device suppliers there comes a wide variety of processes, procedures and controls that are developed specific to a business and to the Medical Device(s) being produced. It is important to understand how the FDA tries to normalize a specific business to the regulation when auditing that business for Design Control compliance. Having a bit of understanding of their view will help make for a much smoother comparison, analogy and a much cleaner and successful audit of a company’s design processes.

A simplistic model can be derived from the 820.30 regulation that the FDA may use to assure design coverage and compliance of a device design and/or manufacture to the regulation. The design and development model can be graphically depicted and loosely linked to the regulation as follows:

FDA Design and Development Planning Model

Diagraming out the design flow is helpful in seeing a more detailed picture of the flow and validation and verification of a product against its intended use model and specifically important to the FDA that each and every stage of the process is well reviewed and documented.

Again, like the FDA regulation on Design Controls, this is a very short summary of complex processes, document definitions, controls and general management & approvals that there have been volumes of books written. The objective should be to have a very good understanding of how the FDA or other regulatory entity views the medical device controls such that a business can demonstrate how their particular controls map into the regulatory model. A logical analogy of a business’ design and development model should be able to map to the regulatory normalized base line model(s), in doing so, will result in smoother audits with a higher degree of success and hopefully (something the regulatory folks don’t really care about but as a business we all do) a lower expense/time in managing through the audit process.

A fuller descriptive paper outlines some key points in the development of a Medtech-specific design control with a product development process and how to maximize the use of enterprise level business tools that accelerate process, streamline audits and make for a much smoother compliance. The brief outline here is a key element to a more streamlined and smoother compliance with regulation keeping in mind not just the business drivers but also the FDA’s “normalized view” of design controls.

Get the full detailed White Paper here

About the Author

Dennis Payton is Vice President of Product Marketing and Development with Expandable Software Inc. He has 24 years of engineering, product management and executive management experience. He holds a BS in electrical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Louis Obispo, and post studies at Stanford University, University of California, Santa Cruz, and UC Berkley Haas School of Business.

 

Copyright UBM Canon. Used by permission.

 

 

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